Going Bold – Part One

I recommend that a person “goes bold” after getting a diagnosis.

I’m on the cusp of 50 and I remember how I used to wear garish theater makeup and weird clothes in my twenties. It was one of the few outlets I had to express myself living in an outer borough of New York City that was like the suburbs.

Yes–I always wanted to live an artist’s life in the city. As I near 50, I understand that at this age it’s high time and high tide for the ultimate self-acceptance. Regret serves no purpose. Looking at ourselves and our lives microscopically, taking a critical lens to our flaws, is an unproductive use of time.

It’s time at this time in our lives to go by the serenity prayer: to change the things we can, to accept the things we can’t change, and to have the wisdom to know the difference.

The difference is–if a woman turns 50 and she still don’t like herself that’s not a good sign when she’ll likely have 20 more years here, living inside her body.

Thus I recommend a person “goes bold” and does the thing she thinks she cannot do. I recommend not taking a backseat to others in society. I recommend reaching for the stars in what you think is possible for you to achieve.

More than this, I recommend “going bold” as soon as you’re diagnosed and not waiting until you’re 50.

A famous quote is this: Only by going too far can a person know how far he can go.

You won’t know what you’re capable of unless you try. And the sooner you try to create a better life for yourself the better. Your parents won’t be here forever. You’ll have to take care of yourself at some point.

It’s better to entertain “going bold” in how you live your life because it’s the best way to kick the stigma to the curb.

I’ll return with a look at how this is directly linked to getting a diagnosis.

Advertisements

Author: Chris Bruni

Christina Bruni is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Left of the Dial. She owns a resume writing and career help business. She contributed a chapter "Recovery is Within Reach" to Benessere Psicologico: Contemporary Thought on Italian American Mental Health. As well as an author and activist, Bruni is an artist and a fitness buff.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s