Making a Difference

In the early 1990s I lived in public housing and collected a government disability check.

I lived below the poverty line in America.

On the approval letter the SSDI interviewer had written words to this effect:

“Signs and symptoms do not totally indicate schizophrenia. Yet inability to work at a job renders her eligible for benefits.”

At the time I also collected Medicaid. Living below the poverty line is no joke.

Today in Kentucky the government is set to pass a law requiring Medicaid recipients to work at a job.

The last I heard a lot of people with mental illnesses who are still actively symptomatic might not be able to work at a job if what’s going on in their head interferes with their rational thinking.

My vision of Recovery for Everyone starts with the clock running today.

My goal is to help people recover.

My focus is on what is possible when people get the right treatment at the right time.

In retrospect I can see there was some kind of benefit when I was just starting out in having been in “the system.”

People with mental health issues who receive benefits like Medicaid are doing the best we can when our illness is severe.

At this time we might require government money in the form of checks and healthcare.

To mandate that a person like you or me has to work at a job to receive Medicaid isn’t right.

It’s not right if we’re not in the right mind to be able to hold a job and do well at a job.

Yet this is the trend in government coming to where you live soon:

Denial of the benefits people require to get their lives back on track.

Those who can are writing into law the denial of benefits leaving every citizen to fend for ourselves.

Making a difference doesn’t cost a dime.

Those of us doing well have the duty to help make things better for those less fortunate.

Call or write your elected officials to tell them what you think. Join a protest if that’s more your style.

The time is now to speak out.

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Read All About It: The Truth

I’ve been corresponding with a woman who calls Mr. Toupee #45.

People who voted into office Mr. Toupee voted for a guy who is going to require Medicaid recipients to work at a job.

Folks: people diagnosed with schizophrenia who are actively psychotic and receive Medicaid aren’t going to be able to find and hold a job for long.

No surprise #45 wants to waive this work requirement rule in white rural areas because it’s harder to find jobs there.

Last I knew it’s harder to find jobs for school-to-prison youth in Brownsville.

My friend Mars and I are confident #45 will win a second term in office.

Another law Mr. Toupee is enacting will allow business owners to not have to create wheelchair-accessible entrances to their stores.

Thus chipping away at an ADA-Act protection that requires wheelchair-accessible entrances. So if you use a wheelchair you won’t have the right to do business in a store.

Remember: Mr. Toupee was voted into office. We voted to allow the president of the United States to do these things. We consented to have our rights taken away when we stepped up to the voting booth and pulled the lever for #45.

We are responsible for the fact that our rights are being taken away.

Realizing just how dire this situation is I no longer fault other people for going on the attack in New York Times editorials and in books they write.

Divide, divide, divide is the motto of our elected officials.

They love to keep people hating each other.

Let’s rise up above this craziness by committing to treating each other with dignity and compassion.

There’s so much we can do person-to-person and in small batches of healthy behavior to counter and conquer this animosity.

Let’s listen to and understand each other.

Let’s champion equal rights for everyone living in America.

Let’s Just Say No to hate.